Alex Ikonn and his wife Mimi launched Luxyhair.com after they realized how hard it was to find great hair extensions in the marketplace. This hair extensions ecommerce retailer has built their business on the fan audience they’ve attracted through YouTube tutorial videos. They have a serious following, which is exactly what has enabled them to grow their business to seven figures since 2010!

If you’ve already created an Amazon account on amazon.com, the easiest way to buy something is to type product keywords into the search bar at the top of the screen and press enter. Click on the product you want and press “Add to cart.” Click on the cart icon in the top right corner and click “Proceed to checkout.” Fill out your shipping and payment information and then click “Place your order.”


Amazon first entered the media industry as a major online retailer in the late ‘90s. The company began by selling CDs and DVDs to a burgeoning market of online shoppers who began turning to the internet for music and movies, before the technical feasibility of streaming and the advent of the iPod. But it wasn’t until 2005, with the initial launch of Amazon Prime, that the company began laying the ground work for a future digital media ecosystem that integrated directly into its online store.

In addition to strict acceptance to be sold by As Seen On TV Incorporated, Telebrands and other distributers, the most successful products have almost always served to provide a solution to a common problem - and this has inspired inventors worldwide to share their creations and push the industry. The industry leaders have always been smart when it comes to marketing, and have recently started making more of a transition towards ecommerce – using micro websites to push their products, and making good use of affiliate programs. Infomercials now support awareness in addition to creating it.

The infomercial industry is huge and is worth a staggering $250 billion as of 2015. It all started back in the late 40’s and early 50’s when major sponsors of serial television programs were soap manufacturers (i.e. Proctor & Gamble, Lever Brothers and Colgate-Palmolive), which is how “soap operas” got their name. There is some controversy although the first infomercial is thought to have been for a blender either made by VitaMix or Waring Blenders and aired in 1949 or 1950. Time limits for commercials were imposed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) not too long after this which halted the growth of infomercials until 1984 when those limits were removed.
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