If you missed the phone number on that infomercial the last time it came onto your screen, Collections Etc. is always expanding our online As Seen on TV catalog to include the latest, greatest and hardest to find products. The next time you see something on the screen that you have to have, head to our store to buy it securely online or through our catalog. Collections Etc. is happy to offer great prices, easy ordering and lower prices for members on unique As Seen on TV products for your home!
On October 16, 2016, Apple filed a trademark infringement case against Mobile Star LLC for selling counterfeit Apple products to Amazon. In the suit, Apple provided evidence that Amazon was selling these counterfeit Apple products and advertising them as genuine. Through purchasing, Apple was able to identify that nearly 90% of the Apple accessories sold and fulfilled by Amazon were counterfeit. Amazon was sourcing and selling items without properly determining if they are genuine. Mobile Star LLC settled with Apple for an undisclosed amount on April 27, 2017.[164]

If you’ve already created an Amazon account on amazon.com, the easiest way to buy something is to type product keywords into the search bar at the top of the screen and press enter. Click on the product you want and press “Add to cart.” Click on the cart icon in the top right corner and click “Proceed to checkout.” Fill out your shipping and payment information and then click “Place your order.”
Amazon hasn’t been content stopping with smart speakers and just standard old appliances under its AmazonBasics brand. In its quest to put Alexa everywhere, the company now sells a dizzying number of smart home devices that go well beyond its core speaker and set-top box beginnings. First there was the Echo Dot, to help bring Alexa to analog speaker systems and get the voice assistant into more rooms of the home. Then there was the Echo Look, for AI-assisted outfit recommendations, and the Echo Show, which contained a display and camera for video chatting and was designed to be a hands-free screen for the kitchen.
In the course of a single generation, Amazon has grown from fledgling online bookseller to one of the most valuable and powerful corporations in modern history. The empire of CEO Jeff Bezos has grown so vast that critics, overseas regulators, and Washington politicians are all now wondering whether the company has become an unstoppable force, and what, if anything, is capable of reining in its reach. A recent spat with Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) resulted in a minimum wage hike for tens of thousands of employees, but Amazon still operates largely without any meaningful checks on its power even as it aggressively expands into physical retail, the smart home, and warehouse and aviation robotics.
Amazon's Prime subscription service costs $99 per year and provides free two-day shipping on items purchased from Amazon that display the "Prime" logo. Prime includes free shipping on Marketplace items that sellers opt to have delivered via Amazon's warehouse, but not on most third-party purchases. Even without Prime, orders over $35 include free basic shipping, but Prime can save you a good amount on shipping if you frequently place small orders or need items delivered quickly. In addition, Prime includes extras such as Prime Instant Video, a streaming video service similar to Netflix, Prime Music, which provides free streaming music, and the ability to borrow one Kindle e-book per month from the Amazon Kindle Lending Library. To start a subscription, click "Your Prime" at the top of any Amazon page.
In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart as the most valuable retailer in the United States by market capitalization.[11] Amazon is the third most valuable public company in the United States (behind Apple and Microsoft),[12] the largest Internet company by revenue in the world, and after Walmart, the second largest employer in the United States.[13] In 2017, Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market for $13.4 billion, which vastly increased Amazon's presence as a brick-and-mortar retailer.[14] The acquisition was interpreted by some as a direct attempt to challenge Walmart's traditional retail stores.[15]
In 1999, Amazon first attempted to enter the publishing business by buying a defunct imprint, "Weathervane", and publishing some books "selected with no apparent thought", according to The New Yorker. The imprint quickly vanished again, and as of 2014 Amazon representatives said that they had never heard of it.[37] Also in 1999, Time magazine named Bezos the Person of the Year when it recognized the company's success in popularizing online shopping.[38]
The infomercial industry is huge and is worth a staggering $250 billion as of 2015. It all started back in the late 40’s and early 50’s when major sponsors of serial television programs were soap manufacturers (i.e. Proctor & Gamble, Lever Brothers and Colgate-Palmolive), which is how “soap operas” got their name. There is some controversy although the first infomercial is thought to have been for a blender either made by VitaMix or Waring Blenders and aired in 1949 or 1950. Time limits for commercials were imposed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) not too long after this which halted the growth of infomercials until 1984 when those limits were removed.
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