Amazon has attracted widespread criticism for poor working conditions by both current employees, who refer to themselves as Amazonians,[178] and former employees,[179][180] as well as the media and politicians. In 2011, it was publicized that at the Breinigsville, Pennsylvania warehouse, workers had to carry out work in 100 °F (38 °C) heat, resulting in employees becoming extremely uncomfortable and suffering from dehydration and collapse. Loading-bay doors were not opened to allow in fresh air, due to the company's concerns over theft.[181] Amazon's initial response was to pay for an ambulance to sit outside on call to cart away overheated employees.[181] The company eventually installed air conditioning at the warehouse.[182]
Sign up for Amazon Family and a Prime account to get special offers, coupons and discounts on family-oriented items. If you aren't a Prime member, you'll get a 5% discount on baby food and diaper subscriptions. Prime members get an additional 15% off with five or more active subscriptions. Get a 15% discount code and a free Welcome Box when you sign up for the Baby Registry.
Amazon.com's product lines available at its website include several media (books, DVDs, music CDs, videotapes and software), apparel, baby products, consumer electronics, beauty products, gourmet food, groceries, health and personal-care items, industrial & scientific supplies, kitchen items, jewelry, watches, lawn and garden items, musical instruments, sporting goods, tools, automotive items and toys & games.[citation needed]
You already know you can save big on Amazon Prime Day 2018, but with these Amazon shopping hacks you can save even more. When you shop through RetailMeNot, you get $10 ​​​​​cash back on orders of $100 (or more) on Amazon. Another excellent way to save every day, not just Prime Day? Download the Honey app, which automatically searches and applies discount codes at check out and gives you points every time you shop online (once you accrue a certain number of points you can cash them in for a gift card).
A 2015 front-page article in The New York Times profiled several former Amazon employees[192] who together described a "bruising" workplace culture in which workers with illness or other personal crises were pushed out or unfairly evaluated.[11] Bezos responded by writing a Sunday memo to employees,[193] in which he disputed the Times's account of "shockingly callous management practices" that he said would never be tolerated at the company.[11]

Aside from creating the logo, A.J Khubani actually played a huge role in the advent of the infomercial as we know it today, which started with his Amber Vision sunglasses in 1987. More recently, his company sold the PedEgg, another As Seen On TV product which has sold 50 million units (in addition to other successful products like the As Seen On TV mop and the As Seen On TV hose). Anyone looking for the same level of success with their own product can pitch their idea to both Telebrands and As Seen On TV, Inc. although they only accept a few submissions each year.

×