Amazon now has more than 100 private label brands, some without the name Amazon even remotely attached, for product categories like clothing, dog food, and furniture. Yet AmazonBasics, and the Amazon Essentials clothing brand, remain the company’s biggest weapons in its war against offline retail. Just as Walmart, Target, and other stores launched their own private label brands for virtually every product imaginable, the company has done the same. (In 2015, it also launched an official Etsy competitor in the form of Amazon Homemade.)
Amazon's Prime subscription service costs $99 per year and provides free two-day shipping on items purchased from Amazon that display the "Prime" logo. Prime includes free shipping on Marketplace items that sellers opt to have delivered via Amazon's warehouse, but not on most third-party purchases. Even without Prime, orders over $35 include free basic shipping, but Prime can save you a good amount on shipping if you frequently place small orders or need items delivered quickly. In addition, Prime includes extras such as Prime Instant Video, a streaming video service similar to Netflix, Prime Music, which provides free streaming music, and the ability to borrow one Kindle e-book per month from the Amazon Kindle Lending Library. To start a subscription, click "Your Prime" at the top of any Amazon page.
That’s a lot of people to compete with, but it can pay off. While smaller items like clothing, consumables, and books won’t see that large of a price cut, Black Friday is still worth the pre-dawn alarm if you’re after deals on big-ticket items. Think: Household appliances, grills, TVs, and other electronics. “Stores use the doorbusters to whip you into a bargain-shopping frenzy in hopes that you'll buy more than the advertised bargains,” says Lisa Lee Freeman, co-host of the Hot Shopping Tips podcast. “The stores often barely break even or even lose money on doorbuster specials, but they make it back when shoppers stick around and buy other items that may not be such great deals.”
Even so, the first infomercial of the same type we see on TV today, aired in 1982 and was for a hair growth supplement called “New Generation” which was marketed by entrepreneur Robert E. Murphy Jr. It was such a success that other companies quickly began following suit and purchasing program-length commercial air time. At this time infomercials used to commonly be shown during late night/early morning hours, although stations discovered success showing them at other times when they learned that the majority of purchases were made in the morning, during the day, and around primetime.
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